Friday, March 20, 2009

Updates: Math Teachers at Play #3, Recognition for MathNotations,...

  • Be sure to stop by at f(t), Kate's excellent math teacher blog. Kate graciously agreed to host the 3rd Edition of the new carnival, Math Teachers at Play, originated by Denise at Let's Play Math. This edition has some fascinating posts, particularly, "When does the sum of three numbers equal their product?" The solution is surprising! I wrote a comment to this on John Cook's blog. Kate has broken the contributions into 4 well-defined categories: Secondary, Primary, Pi Day Roundup and Unclassifiable. Also, don't miss the hysterical cartoon Kate posted at the bottom. It's precious...
  • dy/dan, Let's Play Math, 360 and MathNotations were featured in Mathematics Teaching, one of the journals of the UK's Association of Teachers of Mathematics. The authors took the time to capture the uniqueness and essence of each of these blogs and the reviews are objective and fair. I made a connection with one of the authors and I'm hoping to do an interview focusing on comparisons between math education in our two countries. Here's the link to the article which will be downloaded as a pdf document.
  • MathNotations is currently ranked as the top Math ed blog on Alltop Math.There are a few other sites rated higher but they are not math ed (teacher) blogs.
  • Plenty of new features in the sidebar including the first "ads" I've run on this site. No apologies here -- any support you can give to keep this blog rolling along would be gratefully appreciated...
  • Pi Day may be over but it never really terminates, does it? Well, at least, us math bloggers have twelve monthhs to come up with some new ideas for the occasion!
  • Finally, a 'quickie' for your middle schoolers or for those taking the SATs. Might make a nice review of divisibility, remainders, patterns, problem-solving strategies, etc:

    What is the greatest possble number of Saturdays in a string of 100 consecutive days?


1 comment:

Eric Jablow said...

I have this suggestion for your math puzzle of 21 March: add 1 to both sides of the equation before one attempts the solution.